Don’t mention the ethnic cleansing!

The West Bank was ethnically cleansed in 1948.
East Jerusalem was ethnically cleansed in 1948.
The Gaza Strip was ethnically cleansed in 1948.
But we’re not supposed to mention it.
In 1947, there were tens of thousands of Jews legally in the West Bank. In 1949, there were zero Jews in the West Bank.
In 1947, there were thousands of Jews legally in East Jerusalem, mostly in the historic Jewish Quarter. In 1949, there were zero Jews in East Jerusalem.
In 1947, there were hundreds of Jews legally in the Gaza Strip. In 1949, there were zero Jews in the Gaza Strip.
How is that not ethnic cleansing?
But we’re not supposed to mention it.
The ethnic cleansing was not a by-product of the 1948 war, it was a purpose of the 1948 war.
The Arab League purpose was to expel all Jews from the ‘Arab part’ of the partition, to be enlarged by pushing the partition line as close to the Mediterranean as possible. The Arab League invasion had no other purpose than expulsion of Jews from as great an area as possible.
By contrast, Israel was not ethnically cleansed in 1948 (or since) – in 1949, there were still plenty of Arabs in Israel, who today make up over 20% of Israel’s population, with full citizenship rights.
Israeli radio broadcast to the Arabs to stay, and to become citizens of the democratic new Israel. Jerusalem Arab radio broadcast to the Arabs to leave. Most of the Arabs who left Israel did so willingly, at this request. Others did so to avoid automatically becoming Israeli citizens, under the then well-known provision to that effect in the 1947 United Nations Partition Resolution. The remainder, who left their homes unwillingly as refugees, were lawfully expelled (in Operation Dalet) to prevent them assisting the six invading Arab League armies, in accordance with the international law of warfare.
In 1949, at the Lausanne Conference, the Israelis offered to allow 50,000 Arab refugees to return, as part of a peace treaty – and this was their opening offer, so presumably they would have gone higher. Unfortunately, the Arab League countries refused to make peace, and the state of war continued for decades.
But we’re not supposed to mention any of this.
Between 1948 and 1951, many Arab countries expelled most of their Jews.
In Iraq, for example (where Jews had lived continuously for over 2,500 years, far longer than in Israel), over 250,000 Jews fled, losing not only almost all their property, but also to a great extent their language and their culture.
Some 850,000 Jews fled Arab countries unwillingly in the Jewish Naqba – more than the 750,000 Arabs, willing and unwilling, who fled Israel in the Arab Naqba.
These 850,000 Jewish refugees were all resettled very quickly (many in Israel). The 750,000 Arab refugees, contrary to normal international humanitarian practice, have mostly been kept in refugee camps to this day (with their children and grandchildren).
But we’re not supposed to mention any of this.
The Palestinians went to a lot of trouble to ethnically cleanse the West Bank and East Jerusalem.
The Palestinians are understandably reluctant to allow this ethnic cleansing to be reversed.
The Palestinian Authority has accordingly passed a law imposing capital punishment on any Palestinian citizen who sells land to a Jew (from any country) (though such sentences are always commuted).
Jews can only reverse this ethnic cleansing by living in “settlements”.
The Fourth Geneva Convention, Article 49, was intended to prevent ethnic cleansing. But it is being used to preserve ethnic cleansing, in the West Bank and East Jerusalem.
People using law to preserve ethnic cleansing – is that a good law or a bad law? – are they good people or bad people?
You decide.
But do it without mentioning the ethnic cleansing!
(I mentioned it once or twice, but I think nobody noticed!)

Advertisements

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s